Prostitution

NEW YORK PROSTITUTION LAWYER

Patronizing a Prostitute

New York Criminal Defense Attorney for Brooklyn, Manhattan, Bronx and Queens, New York

Individuals who patronize a prostitute are violating New York Penal Code 230.04, 230.05 or 230.06. The Penal Code delineates varying degrees of patronizing a prostitute. The most serious are categorized as felonies while the lesser are misdemeanors. Individuals who have been charged with patronizing a prostitute face the stigma and embarrassment of being associated with prostitution. This may negatively harm their reputation, their relationships with loved ones and family, and even their future employment prospects.

Patronizing a prostitute in the first degree involves patronizing a prostitute and the person patronized is less than eleven years of age. This is a Class D Felony and if convicted, can result in a prison term of up to seven years. Patronizing a prostitute in the second degree involves patronizing a prostitute when, being over eighteen years of age, an individual patronizes a prostitute and the person patronized is less than fourteen years of age. This is a Class E Felony, and if convicted, can result in a prison term of up to four years. Patronizing a prostitute in the third degree involves patronizing a prostitute when, being over twenty-one years of age, an individual patronizes a prostitute and the person patronized is less than seventeen years of age.

It is important to take criminal charges of patronizing a prostitute seriously. Regardless of the circumstances of the charges brought against you, you will want to have the consequences of these charges minimized. Being convicted of a felony, with its possible punishments and a criminal record, may have long-lasting negative effects on your future. It is in your best interests to consult with the Brooklyn prostitution defense attorney at the firm as soon as possible so that he can begin investigating and building your defense.

Prostitution

Many times, criminal charges against the owners, operators, employees and independent contractors associated with an "escort service" result from an undercover investigation wherein undercover officers acting as customers are offered sexual favors for additional fees. "Johns" are typically arrested when they show up at a hotel to meet who they believe is a prositute but who in fact is an undercover officer. Charges range from Prostitution, Patronizing a prostitute, Promoting prostitution, Sex trafficking and Permitting prostitution. Related charges might include Money Laundering and Falsifying Business Records. Jason A. Steinberger can handle any Prostitution, Sex offense, Money Laundering, Rape and other related charges. 

Arrested for Patronizing and/or Solicitation?

Usually, escort services advertise in the Yellow Pages, newspapers, magazines and on the Internet. True escort services are legal.  It is entirely legal for one to pay another to accompany them and spend time with them. The legal troubles arise when offers of sex are made or solicited. Simply offering to engage in sexual conduct with another person in return for a fee is a Prostitution charge, which is a B misdemeanor. The charge Patronizing a Prostitute can range from an A misdemeanor to a D felony depending on the age of the person patronized. For example if the person patronized is less than 11 years of age, the charge is a D Felony. However, unlike a statutory rape charge where the defendant's belief as to victim's age is irrelvant and not a defense, when dealing with Patronzing a Prostitute charges, it is a statutory defense that the defendant did not have reasonable grounds to believe that the person was less than the age specified. Furthermore, engaging in sexual relations with one less than 17 years of age can also result various sex offense charges such as Rape, Sodomy, Sexual Abuse and Forcible Touching.

Arrested for Promoting?

 Owners and operators of Escort Services can face a wide range of charges including Promoting Prostitution, Compelling Prostitution, Sex Trafficking and Permitting Prostitution. Claims by the owners and/or managers that they didn't approve of and/or were not aware of sexual acts committed by the escorts many times fail because the government can show that the owners and/or managers (1) kept records of customers' sexual preferences; (2) kept records of customers sexually transmitted diseases (STDs); (3) advised the escorts on how to avoid and treat infections caused by frequent use of lubricated condoms; (4) advised the escorts on methods by which they could continue working while menstruating; and (5) instructed them on how to identify undercover police officers. Owners and operators often face other charges including Money Laundering and Falsifying Business Records.